It seems like all we can think about is our metabolism. 

Is it working fast enough, can we increase our metabolic rate, is it burning those calories, and is it making maximum use of all that good nutrition we’re trying so hard to make part of our daily diet? 

Better yet, what is metabolism and how do we take control of it?  

Getting to that “magic” number on the bathroom scale is an awesome achievement, but weight alone does not necessarily mean that we are metabolically healthy, however.

Metabolic health is defined by experts as having ideal levels of blood sugar, high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”) cholesterol, triglycerides (a type of fat found in blood), blood pressure and waist circumference, and all without using medications.

These markers are linked to risks for diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

In fact, according to a recent study, one which looked at data from 8,721 adults from 2009 to 2016, only 12 percent of adults have optimal metabolic health.

The holidays are in full swing and it seems like all we can think about is our metabolism.

Is it working fast enough, is it burning those calories, and is it making maximum use of all that good nutrition that we’re trying so hard to make part of our daily diet?

Better yet, what is metabolism and how do we take control of it? 

The term “metabolism” is commonly used to refer to the break-down of food and its transformation into energy.

Highlights:

  • Why we need inflammation — up to a point
  • The runaway train of chronic inflammation
  • Stress, obesity and our metabolism
  • Nutrition wisdom from 2.5 million years ago
  • Good nutrition and Almased

Highlights:

  • Yo-yo diets lead to extra weight, more fat and increased risk for health problems
  • Our caveman metabolism?
  • 2 million years ago a metabolic switch was pulled
  • Real change is needed for lasting weight-loss success
  • Almased helps us curb cravings, burn fat and retain muscle as part of a new approach to overall health

According to the National Center for Health Statistics, nearly half of Americans surveyed between 2013 and 2016 said they tried to lose weight in the past year.

Fact is, over 95 percent of people who experiment with fad diets aren’t able to achieve their health, calorie-burn or fat-loss goals.