Foods that are fermented — meaning they use starter cultures of bacteria or yeast — have been part of traditional diets for centuries. 

In fact, fermented honey, or “ambrosia” in mythology, was the drink of the Greek gods that supposedly gave immortality to whoever consumed it. 

Archeologists have found evidence of fermented alcoholic beverages made from fruit and rice dating back to 7000 BC in China. Wine-making (which is essentially preserved grape juice) goes back to 6000 BC in Europe. 

In fact, the oldest archaeological record of fermentation is 13,000-year-old beer residue found in in Israel. 

But how did humans figure out how to control the power of fermentation to begin with? Totally by chance. Milk would ferment unintentionally, so the first yogurts were probably complete accidents, produced in milk-filled bags that were slung on the backs of camels in North Africa.

Highlights:

  • Supplements may meet minimum requirements, but vary greatly in quality, and may legally contain unhealthy ingredients and additives
  • Fake colors
  • Synthetic fillers
  • Artificial preservatives
  • Synthetic sweeteners
  • BHA and BHT
  • Carrageenan
  • GMOs

Supplements have the power to revolutionize your health, to super-charge your diet and to help — along with exercise — to transform your life.

But, you want to make sure you choose the right supplements that are made with clean ingredients — and without the bad stuff.

Most people consider oil a kitchen staple. Recent research suggests certain types of oils are beneficial to our health. However, others tout the benefits of oil-free cooking. So, you may find yourself asking, ‘if I want to lose weight, should I use oil in my cooking?’ The short answer is it’s a slippery slope: We recommend steering clear of some (trans and saturated) and only moderately consuming others (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated).

Highlights

  •  Food cravings are powerful
  •  Eat more protein
  •  Drink more water
  • Get more sleep
  • Reduce stress
  • Try a 14-day modified fast

Food cravings are powerful. In fact, they can make the strongest person feel like Supergirl sitting at a dinner table built of kryptonite.

Whether for food, in general, or carbs — more likely — they can be intense, often caused by foods high in sugar or carbohydrates.

It's no wonder that these foods can be irresistible, since our desire for them is fueled by the addictive way they cause us to release feel-good chemicals in the brain, like serotonin and dopamine.

Christmas is a few days away! While we are busy planning how we’ll spend our day with our loved ones, the last thing we want to think about is our diet. The average weight gain for Americans during the holidays is 5 pounds or more. Indeed, avoiding holiday weight gain is this season’s goal.